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Initial Insights into Phoneme Awareness Intervention for Children with Complex Communication Needs (summary)

 
Insights
 
into
 
Phoneme
Awareness
Intervention
 
for
Children
 
with
Complex
Communication
Needs

Background

Phoneme awareness is the ability to recognise and manipulate the individual sounds in spoken words and is part of the broader phonological awareness that is essential to the development of early reading skills. Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often have significant and long-term difficulties in the development of literacy; poor phoneme awareness has been suggested as possibly limiting their word recognition and spelling skills.

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Initial Insights into Phoneme Awareness Intervention for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
Insights
into
 
phoneme
 
awareness
 
intervention
 
for
children
 
with
complex
communication
needs

This study aimed to determine if phoneme awareness skills can be taught to children with complex communication needs (CCN), to observe any transfer effects to tasks that were not directly targeted during the intervention and to their ability to produce and record written words.

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Social Interactions of Students with Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Inclusive Classrooms (summary)

Background

The importance of peer interaction for students with severe disabilities has been recognised for a long time, with peer interactions promoting development and learning in school-age children. There is evidence that good peer interaction experiences are associated with a range of positive outcomes whilst the reverse is true of a lack of peer relationships.

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Social Interactions of Students with Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Inclusive Classrooms (short summary)

Social
interaction
of
pupils
who
use
AAC

The authors investigated the social communication interactions of 16 pupils with intellectual disabilities and/or autism, in mainstream classes. All participants used some form of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and were supported in school by one to one support workers.

They found that the students who used AAC had significantly more interactions with adults than with their typically developing peers. They also tended to initiate fewer interactions and these were for different communicative functions.

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Barriers to Participation in Kindergarten Literacy Instruction for a Student with Augmentative and Alternative Communication Needs (summary)

Barriers
to
Participation
in
Kindergarten
Literacy

Background
Many individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) have been found to have difficulties in developing reading and writing skills. This can lead to difficulty in effectively participating in mainstream education activities.

Barriers to Participation in Kindergarten Literacy Instruction for a Student with Augmentative and Alternative Communication Needs (short summary)

Barriers
to
Participation
in
Kindergarten
Literacy

The author studied a single seven year old child with severe speech and mild cognitive impairment and challenging behaviours, who attended a mainstream kindergarten setting on a part-time basis. Barriers to the development of his early literacy skills were identified and divided into access and opportunity barriers. Access barriers refer to those related to the AAC users own needs, skills and abilities, opportunity barriers are imposed by others policy, practice, attitude, knowledge and skill.

Teaching 1:1 workers to support young children with CCN (summary)

Teaching
staff
 
to
support
young children
with
communication
needs

Background In school and preschool settings 1:1 support workers (paraeducators) are important and frequent communication partners for young children who have complex communication needs. There has been little research into impact of training on the way these support workers communicate with the children during play.

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Teaching 1:1 workers to support young children with CCN (short summary)

Methods
 
to
support
young children
with
complex
communication
needs

The authors gave 2 hours of individual training to a small number of one to one support workers who each worked with a preschool child with complex communication needs.

They found that in each case the number of communication opportunities offered to the children in play sessions and the number of communication turns taken by the children increased.


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