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Bridging the gap from values to actions: a family systems framework for family-centered AAC services (summary)

Bridging
 
the
gap
 
from
values
 
to
actions:
 
a
family
 
systems
framework
 
for
 
family-centered
AAC
 
services

Background

The importance of family-centred interventions that recognise and acknowledge the differences between families and the roles all family members have to play in the success of input for people with additional needs have been increasingly recognised as important in the delivery of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) services.

Family structures are increasingly diverse and studies have found that AAC intervention practices often lack family-centredness often being more professionally centred.

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Bridging the gap from values to actions: a family systems framework for family-centered AAC services (short summary)

Bridging
 
the
gap
 
from
values
 
to
actions:
 
a
family
 
systems
framework
 
for
 
family-centered
AAC
 
services

The importance of family-centred interventions that recognise and acknowledge the differences between families and the roles all family members have to play in the success of input for people with additional needs have been increasingly recognised as important in the delivery of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) services.

Professionals often intend to offer family-centred AAC services but face various and numerous challenges in delivering them.

The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (summary)

 
The
 
Effects
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

Background

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

Teaching speech to this group can be a very lengthy process and throughout this children do not have an effective means of communication.

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (short summary)

 
The
 
Effects
 
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

Background

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (short summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Comparison of Communication using an iPad and a Picture Based System (short summary)

Comparison
of
Communication
using
iPad
 
and
Symbols

The communication behaviours of five pupils with ASD and/or learning disabilities were compared using either a picture symbol communication system or the 'Pick a Word' app on the iPad.

The authors found that use of the iPad did not detract from the pupil's communication; the number of communication behaviours either increased or stayed the same.

They also suggest that though iPads are now readily available they are not necessarily better than other speech generating devices and more research is needed into comparing the systems.

Comparison of Communication using an iPad and a Picture Based System (summary)

Comparison
of
Communication
Using
iPad
 
and
Symbols

Background AAC interventions have been shown to improve social and communication skills in young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (autism) and other developmental disabilities. Systems which include visual symbols might appeal to the visual strengths of some people with autism and systems such as the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) have been found to be effective for many people in this group.

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