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Augmentative and alternative communication for children with autism spectrum disorder: An evidence-based evaluation of the Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) programme (short summary)

AAC
 
for
children
 
with
Autism:
Evaluation
 
of
 
the
 
LAMP
 
approach

The Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) approach to teaching language using a voice output communication aid (VOCA) was used over a five week period with eight children, aged between 4 and 12, who had ASD. Parents and teachers were also trained to use the LAMP approach. The study aimed to test whether augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems can improve the functional communication of children with ASD in their daily lives.

The researchers used the LAMP approach in addressing 4 aims:

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (summary)

 
The
 
Effects
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

Background

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

Teaching speech to this group can be a very lengthy process and throughout this children do not have an effective means of communication.

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (short summary)

 
The
 
Effects
 
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

Background

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (short summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Speech-Generating Devices Used at Home by Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (summary)

VOCAs
 
used
 
at
Home
 
by
Children
 
with
 
ASD

Background

Difficulties with language and communication are a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many people who have ASD might benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) either permanently or in the short-term. The development of technology and a range of speech generating devices (SGDs) can be effective for some people with ASD who have limited or no functional speech.

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Speech-Generating Devices Used at Home by Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (short summary)

VOCAs
 
used
 
at
Home
 
by
Children
 
with
 
ASD

Difficulties with language and communication are a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many people who have ASD might benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) either permanently or in the short-term. The development of technology and a range of speech generating devices (SGDs) can be effective for some people with ASD who have limited or no functional speech.

This study looked at the use of speech generating devices (SGDs) at home and with children who had some functional speech.

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Professionals’ and parents’ shared learning in blended learning networks related to communication and augmentative and alternative communication for people with severe disabilities (summary)

Professionals’
 
and
parents’
shared
learning

Background

People with severe disabilities (SD) often have complex communication needs (CCN) and are dependent on other to support them to be able to participate in activities of daily living. Their communication is often difficult for unfamiliar people to understand and might be supported by the use of various forms of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). People with whom they spend a lot of time have in-depth knowledge of how to communicate with people with SD and are often very skilled communication partners.

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Professionals’ and parents’ shared learning in blended learning networks related to communication and augmentative and alternative communication for people with severe disabilities (short summary)

Professionals’
 
and
parents’
shared
learning

Researchers looked into the use of Blended Learning Networks, on-line groups consisting of parents and professionals, as a way to share learning and experience about the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) with people with severe disabilities who have complex communication needs (CCN).

The groups considered a number of topics related to AAC and evaluated their experiences of the BLNs at the end of the study period.

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Using different methods to communicate: how adults with severe acquired communication difficulties make decisions about the communication methods they use and how they experience them (summary)

Using
different
methods
 
to
communicate

Background

It is recognised that assistive technologies, including augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be beneficial in helping improve the quality of life for adults with complex needs. People with acquired communication difficulties have to make many decisions about new technologies and also learn how to use them.

Involving communication aid users in decision making about which systems to use and in what situations is known to be beneficial but does not always happen.

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