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aided communication

communication aids or devices are used to help communication, described more fully on the Communication Matters website http://www.communicationmatters.org.uk/glossary-term/aided-communication

Communication boards in critical care: patients’ views (short summary)

Communication boards
for
patients

The authors interviewed patients who had been ventilated in a critical care ward to find out their perceptions of their levels of frustration when they were unable to communicate effectively, how they thought this might be alleviated by the use of a communication board and what they thought would be useful for the board to contain.

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SPEACS-2: Intensive Care Unit ‘‘Communication Rounds’’ with Speech Language Pathology (summary)

training
nurses

Background

Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses are extremely important in supporting the communication of critically ill patients who are unable to speak, but they usually have very limited training in how best to do this, and insufficient access to speech and language therapists (SLTs). The authors looked at the impact of a web-based training package for nurses on care quality and clinical outcomes for older patients on ICU.

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SPEACS-2: Intensive Care Unit ‘‘Communication Rounds’’ with Speech Language Pathology (short summary)

training
nurses

The authors investigated the use of a web-based training package for nurses working with non-speaking elderly patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and the benefits of speech and language therapy (SLT) led 'communication rounds' on ICUs.

Case studies are used to demonstrate the types of communication strategies that were useful in improving communication for patients, families and nursing staff.

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Augmentative and alternative communication in daily clinical practice: strategies and tools for management of severe communication disorders (summary)

Use
of
AAC
after
a
stroke

Background

People who have had strokes often use natural speech in combination with various AAC strategies to improve the effectiveness of their communication. These strategies might change over time as communication needs change.

Interventions to help build stroke patients' communicative competence need to consider a wide variety of factors including the individual, their environments and their communication partners. They should not necessarily be seeking a 'cure', rather to implement strategies to compensate for difficulties.

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Augmentative and alternative communication in daily clinical practice: strategies and tools for management of severe communication disorders (short summary)

Use
of
AAC
after
a
stroke

This paper looks at the use of AAC with people who have had a stroke. Possible reasons for abandonment or unwillingness to use AAC systems are considered. The authors describe various elements of communicative competence that need to be taken into account when working with stroke patients and their families and carers and emphasise that the needs of people with severe communication impairments are diverse, as are considerations to be taken in identifying possible support systems.

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Use of augmentative and alternative communication strategies by family members in the intensive care unit (short summary)

Use
of
AAC
by
family members
in
hospital

The use of AAC strategies by families of critically ill patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) was reviewed. 44% of families were found to use some form of AAC support in their communication with ill relatives. Their views about AAC and confidence in using it were rated more positively when the nurses they were working with had been given some training in communication strategies.

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Use of augmentative and alternative communication strategies by family members in the intensive care unit (summary)

Use
of
AAC
by
family members
in
hospital

Background
Family members are often relied upon to act as spokesmen for critically ill patients, but do not always have the skills needed to support patients' communication.

Little is known about how families are able to use AAC systems and how they feel about these forms of communication.

There has been little investigation into the involvement of families in use of AAC with non-speaking patients in intensive care units (ICUs).

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Nursing the patient with severe communication impairment (summary)

Nurses
 
and
patients
with
severe
communication
impairment

Background

Good communication between hospital nurses and their patients is very important and the need for pre and post-qualification training in communicating with a wide range of patients is essential. This paper aims to get a better understanding of the experiences of nurses in communicating with patients who have severe communication impairment (SCI).

Patients who are unable to speak, either permanently or temporarily, have been found to experience anxiety and frustration because of difficulties in communicating with nurses.

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Nursing the patient with severe communication impairment (short summary)

Nurses
 
and
patients
with
severe
communication
impairment

This paper looks at information from interviews with nurses about their positive and negative experiences of nursing patients with severe communication impairment.

They generally found communication to be difficult, largely due to the additional time required, but also found some effective strategies to facilitate it.

Many problems resulted from the lack of an easily understandable communication system that both nurse and patient could use.

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The effect of aided language stimulation on vocabulary acquisition in children with little or no functional speech (summary)

Helping
children
without
speech
learn
new
words

Background
There has been limited research into the role of the use of graphic symbols in helping the development of understanding of either spoken language or AAC symbols for people who use AAC.

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