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Native voice, self-concept and the moral case for personalized voice technology (summary)

 
Native
voice,
self-concept
 
and
 
the
moral
 
case
 
for
 
personalized
voice
technology

AAC devices currently in common use have a limited number of different voices available and these are not natural sounding of easily able to express emotions; this can be a reason for some people who might benefit choosing not to use them.

This paper considers the importance of voice and the impact of its loss on people with acquired communication difficulties such as Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke etc.

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Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of ‘‘smart’’ mobile devices (summary)

AAC devices
 
for
 
aphasia;
 
the
 
role
of
smart
mobile
 
devices

Background

Despite the increase in availability of mobile apps and smart technology for communication there has been little research into their use with adults who have aphasia; usually an older age group with acquired communication difficulties.

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Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of ‘‘smart’’ mobile devices (short summary)

AAC devices
 
for
 
aphasia;
 
the
 
role
 
of
smart
mobile
 
devices

People who have aphasia often use a combination of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies to support their interactions.

This paper aimed to gather an overall perspective on high-tech device use in this population through gathering information from professionals working with them. The information was gathered via a web-based survey of professionals, observation of group therapy sessions and focus groups of clinicians from the group therapy centres.

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Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of ‘‘smart’’ mobile devices (short summary)

People who have aphasia often use a combination of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies to support their interactions.

This paper aimed to gather an overall perspective on high-tech device use in this population through gathering information from professionals working with them. The information was gathered via a web-based survey of professionals, observation of group therapy sessions and focus groups of clinicians from the group therapy centres.

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The use of social media by adults with acquired conditions who use AAC: current gaps and considerations in research (summary)

 
The
 
use
 
of
social
media
 
by
adults
 
with
acquired
 
conditions
 
who
 
use
AAC:
 
current
gaps
 
and
considerations
 
in
research

Background

There are increasing numbers of adults with acquired neurological disorders who might use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The range of disorders is diverse, including stroke, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, head and neck cancer, traumatic brain injury etc.

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The use of social media by adults with acquired conditions who use AAC: current gaps and considerations in research (short summary)

 
The
 
use
 
of
social
media
 
by
adults
 
with
acquired
 
conditions
 
who
 
use
AAC:
 
current
gaps
 
and
considerations
 
in
research

This paper considers the use of social media for communication by adults with a range of acquired neurological disorders. It briefly reviews the limited research into social media use by this population and discusses both positive and negative aspects.
The author aims to summarise recent research findings on adults with acquired conditions who use AAC and social media, identify gaps and priorities for future research in this area and suggest how the research might be performed. Seven priority areas for research to develop the evidence base in this field are identified and discussed.

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Social media experiences of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (summary)

Social
Media
 
Experiences
 
of
People
 
with
Cerebral Palsy
 
who
 
use
AAC

Background

Recent developments in technology have increased opportunities for communication through social media.

For people who use augmentative and alternative communication (PWUAAC) the new opportunities are not always matched by improved access.

A much lower percentage of people with disabilities use the internet than those without disabilities across all age groups. People who do not have internet access might become isolated compared to those who do.

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Social media experiences of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (short summary)

Social
Media
 
Experiences
 
of
People
 
with
Cerebral Palsy
 
who
 
use
AAC

Recent developments in technology have increased opportunities for communication through social media, however for people who use augmentative and alternative communication (PWUAAC) the new opportunities are not always matched by improved access.

A much lower percentage of people with disabilities use the internet than those without disabilities across all age groups.

This study looked at the views and experiences of adults who have cerebral palsy about using social media.

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