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Non-electronic communication aids (short summary)

Low
technology
communication

This paper explored support for non-electronic communication aids. These low-tech forms of AAC may be just as valuable as high-tech aids for adults with disabilities, but most government policy and research literature addresses electronic communication aids, or speech-generating devices. The Non-Electronic Communication Aids Scheme, a pilot project run in Victoria, Australia, demonstrated that adults with a variety of diagnoses can benefit from non-electronic aids, and the project received a greater demand than it could accommodate.

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Non-electronic communication aids (summary)

Low
technology
communication

Background There are two main types of communication aids. High-tech, or electronic, communication aids include speech-generating devices with a variety of ways to generate messages. Low-tech, or non-electronic, communication aids do not have speech output functions and also lack other features that may assist the speedy generation of messages.

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Teaching 1:1 workers to support young children with CCN (summary)

Teaching
staff
 
to
support
young children
with
communication
needs

Background In school and preschool settings 1:1 support workers (paraeducators) are important and frequent communication partners for young children who have complex communication needs. There has been little research into impact of training on the way these support workers communicate with the children during play.

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Teaching 1:1 workers to support young children with CCN (short summary)

Methods
 
to
support
young children
with
complex
communication
needs

The authors gave 2 hours of individual training to a small number of one to one support workers who each worked with a preschool child with complex communication needs.

They found that in each case the number of communication opportunities offered to the children in play sessions and the number of communication turns taken by the children increased.


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Non-electronic communication aids for people with complex communication needs

Non-electronic communication aids for people with complex communication needs, Iacono, T, Lyon K., and West D. , International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Oct, Volume 13, Issue 5, p.399-410, (2011)
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Assessing AAC preferences developmental disabilities-review (summary)

AAC
choices
 
&
learning disability

What was the aim of the study? The authors reviewed studies that determined the type of AAC that individuals with developmental disabilities preferred.

Why was the paper written? Individuals with developmental disabilities may often benefit from AAC, which puts clinicians, families and users in the position of selecting which type of AAC may best serve individual circumstances. Accounting for the user's perspective is an important step in promoting self-determination and could possibly affect the outcomes of the AAC intervention.

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