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Speech-language pathologists' views on mentoring by people who use speech generating devices (short summary)

Speech and language therapists
views
 
on
 
mentoring
 
by
people
 
who
use
VOCAs

Developing communicative competence in the use of a speech generating device (SGD) can be challenging for new users. It is possible that using competent SGD users as mentors might be beneficial in the early stages of learning to use a device. Mentors might be able to help overcome some of the challenges to learning to use an SGD such as; the lack of speech and language pathologist (SLP) service provision, the amount of practise needed, lack of SLPs with specialist augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) knowledge and experience etc.

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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Background

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. This means that opportunities to communicate functionally need to be created and supported in the children’s natural environments including schools.

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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

Background

Many people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fail to develop enough speech to meet their everyday communication needs. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has been used successfully with some of this population. Possible AAC strategies for children with ASD include the use of manual signing, picture exchange and speech generating devices (SGDs). This leads to the question of which of these systems should be taught to any individual.

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Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (short summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

In this study, related to McLay et al 2015, the authors investigated whether two boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) could be taught to request continuation of toy play using ‘more’ using three different augmentative and alternative communication systems; signing, picture exchange and a speech generating device (SGD), whether this learning would be maintained over time and whether they would show a preference for any of the AAC systems over the others.

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Children Who Use Communication Aids Instructing Peer and Adult Partners During Play-Based Activity (summary)

Children
 
Who
 
Use
AAC
 
Giving
Instructions
 
During
Play

Background

Play is important to children’s social, emotional and cognitive development, helping to develop an understanding of the world, problem solving skills etc. It is not known how limited access to play might affect children with significant motor impairment who use communication aids as they acquire language.

Children Who Use Communication Aids Instructing Peer and Adult Partners During Play-Based Activity (short summary)

Children
 
Who
 
Use
AAC
 
Giving
Instructions
 
During
Play

This study investigates the way in which children with severe motor impairments who use AAC are able to use language to give instructions to familiar communication partners in barrier activities involving construction play. It investigates their use of referential communication i.e. their ability to name or describe items so that the listener can identify them. The tasks used in the study included dressing a doll, making a bead necklace, building a tower of blocks and making a pattern of dominoes.

‘‘It’s got to be more than that’’. Parents and speech-language pathologists discuss training content for families with a new speech generating device (summary)

Training
 
for
families
 
with
 
a
new
VOCA

Background

Parents have a central role in supporting children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) to become competent and effective communicators. They are often the main teacher, programmer and advocate for the user and device in a variety of settings. High-tech speech generating devices (SGDs) are complex systems that require a great deal of learning by new users in terms of understanding the technology and how to use it as well as maintaining it.

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