Navbar
Content

adults

A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse communication with patients with complex communication needs with a focus on the use of augmentative and alternative communication (summary)

Communication
between
nurses
 
and
patients
with
complex
communication
needs

Background

Nurses work in a wide variety of healthcare settings and with a wide range of patients, many of whom might have severely impaired communication skills, either temporarily or permanently, and who might benefit from communication support.

Effective nurse-patient communication is very important in efficient care provision but nurses typically receive very little education or training in the use of supportive communication strategies.

What did the authors do?

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse communication with patients with complex communication needs with a focus on the use of augmentative and alternative communication (short summary)

Communication
between
nurses
 
and
patients
with
complex
communication
needs

A systematic review of literature related to research regarding communication between nurses and patients with complex communication needs (CCN) was carried out. Papers were published in English in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2007 and addressed one or more of 4 identified areas: importance of communication, barriers to effective communication, supports needed for effective communication and recommendations for improving the effectiveness of communication between nurses and patients with CCN.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Use of augmentative and alternative communication strategies by family members in the intensive care unit (short summary)

Use
of
AAC
by
family members
in
hospital

The use of AAC strategies by families of critically ill patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) was reviewed. 44% of families were found to use some form of AAC support in their communication with ill relatives. Their views about AAC and confidence in using it were rated more positively when the nurses they were working with had been given some training in communication strategies.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Use of augmentative and alternative communication strategies by family members in the intensive care unit (summary)

Use
of
AAC
by
family members
in
hospital

Background
Family members are often relied upon to act as spokesmen for critically ill patients, but do not always have the skills needed to support patients' communication.

Little is known about how families are able to use AAC systems and how they feel about these forms of communication.

There has been little investigation into the involvement of families in use of AAC with non-speaking patients in intensive care units (ICUs).

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Nursing the patient with severe communication impairment (summary)

Nurses
 
and
patients
with
severe
communication
impairment

Background

Good communication between hospital nurses and their patients is very important and the need for pre and post-qualification training in communicating with a wide range of patients is essential. This paper aims to get a better understanding of the experiences of nurses in communicating with patients who have severe communication impairment (SCI).

Patients who are unable to speak, either permanently or temporarily, have been found to experience anxiety and frustration because of difficulties in communicating with nurses.

Tags: 
Tags: 

Nursing the patient with severe communication impairment (short summary)

Nurses
 
and
patients
with
severe
communication
impairment

This paper looks at information from interviews with nurses about their positive and negative experiences of nursing patients with severe communication impairment.

They generally found communication to be difficult, largely due to the additional time required, but also found some effective strategies to facilitate it.

Many problems resulted from the lack of an easily understandable communication system that both nurse and patient could use.

Tags: 
Tags: 

Exploring Communication Assistants as an Option for Increasing Communication Access to Communities for People who use Augmentative Communication (summary)

Use
of
communication assistants

Background

Community participation and inclusion are fundamental principles within the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and communication is central to this process. It is therefore important to identify supports needed by people who use AAC (PWUAAC) to enable them to fully participate in society and to communicate with others within their communities.

People with complex communication needs (CCN) report a number of communication barriers with unfamiliar people, which can increase feelings of social isolation.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Exploring Communication Assistants as an Option for Increasing Communication Access to Communities for People who use Augmentative Communication (short summary)

Use
of
communication assistants

13 communication assistants were trained to work with 9 people who use AAC (PWUAAC), to support their communication within their local communities and to increase opportunities for and quality of interactions with other communication partners.

AAC users used the assistants to help them prepare for communication events, support them in making phone calls, writing and using the internet and communicating directly with familiar and unfamiliar communication partners and other PWUAAC, over a 9 month period.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Light Technology Augmentative Communication for Acute Care and Rehab Settings (summary)

Low
technology
AAC
after
stroke

Background

Therapists working in hospital settings with patients who have recently had a stroke try both to improve the patient's ability to communicate functionally and to give strategies to help compensate for communication difficulties that might remain.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Light Technology Augmentative Communication for Acute Care and Rehab Settings (short summary)

Low
technology
AAC
after
stroke

A consideration of the role of low and light-tech AAC strategies in helping people compensate for communication difficulties as a result of a stroke.

This paper looks at a number of different possible approaches to supporting communication for people with aphasia in the early stages of recovery and emphasises the importance of involving patients and their families in decisions about their care.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Syndicate content