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Prelinguistic predictors of language development in children with autism spectrum disorders over four-five years

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TitlePrelinguistic predictors of language development in children with autism spectrum disorders over four-five years
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractThis study examined relationships between prelinguistic variables from the MacArthur-Bates CD I and the development of language comprehension and production in children with autism. Forty-four children were assessed at baseline and 6, 12, 24, 33 and 53 months later. Growth Curve Modeling was used to examine the extent to which three composite CDI variables and three CDI item groupings predicted language development over 4-5 years. When examined individually, prespeech and early gestures were significant predictors of change for both comprehension and production, but late gestures were not. In addition, initiating joint attention and games and routines predicted comprehension and production over 4-5 years, and conventional gestures also predicted production. When all factors were considered simultaneously, children's ability to participate in games and routines was the only significant predictor of language production over time. The results are discussed with regard to their implications for understanding the complex factors that affect developmental outcomes.
AuthorsBopp, K. D., and Mirenda P.
Year of Publication2011
PublicationJournal of Child Language.
Volume38
Issue3
Pages485-503
ISSN0305-0009 (print), 1469-7602 (electronic)
Publisher DOIhttp://journals.cambridge.org/CMAccess
NotesCambridge University Press, responsible for the promotion of Journal of Child Language, have allowed *full text access* to a collection of papers, which can only be accessed through this web link: http://journals.cambridge.org/CMAccess until 30th June 2013.
Reseach NotesPortions of this study were presented at the 2008 International Meeting for Autism Research in London, UK; and the 2008 Conference of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Chicago, IL. This research was funded through a post-doctoral fellowship from the National Alliance for Autism Research/Autism Speaks and a grant from the Ministry of Children and Family Development in British Columbia, Canada.
Keywords (MeSH)attention, autistic disorder, child, child development disorders, child language, comprehension, gestures, language development disorders, longitudinal studies, play & playthings, social participation
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