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The effect of aided language stimulation on vocabulary acquisition in children with little or no functional speech

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TitleThe effect of aided language stimulation on vocabulary acquisition in children with little or no functional speech
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractPurpose: To describe the nature and frequency of the aided language stimulation program and determine the effects of a 3-week-long aided language stimulation program on the vocabulary acquisition skills of children with little or no functional speech (LNFS). Method: Four children participated in this single-subject, multiple-probe study across activities. The aided language stimulation program comprised 3 activities: arts and crafts, food preparation, and story time activity. Each activity was repeated over the duration of 5 subsequent sessions. Eight target vocabulary items were taught within each activity. The acquisition of all 24 target items was probed throughout the duration of the 3-week intervention period. Results: The frequency and nature of the aided language stimulation provided met the criterion of being used 70% of the time and providing aided language stimulation with an 80:20 ratio of statements to questions. The results indicated that all 4 participants acquired the target vocabulary items. There were, however, variations in the rate of acquisition. Conclusions: This study explores the impact of aided language stimulation on vocabulary acquisition in children. The most important clinical implication of this study is that a 3-week intervention program in aided language stimulation was sufficient to facilitate the comprehension of at least 24 vocabulary items in 4 children with LNFS.
AuthorsDada, S., and Alant E.
Year of Publication2009
PublicationAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume18
Issue1
Pages50-64
ISSN1058-0360 (print); 1558-9110 (online)
Publisher DOIhttp://ajslp.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=1757603
Keywords (MeSH)cerebral palsy, child, Down syndrome, language disorders, language therapy, learning, speech, vocabulary