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The Vocabulary of Beginning Writers: Implications for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
The
Vocabulary
 
of
Young
Writers:
Implications
 
for
Children
 
with
 
CCN

This study investigated the vocabulary used in the self-selected writing of typically developing young school age children in USA and New Zealand and considered whether the information gathered could be beneficial in selecting vocabulary available on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to support the development of writing for children with complex communication needs (CCN).

It was found that a small core vocabulary accounted for a large percentage of the written work and this was largely grammatical words.

The single word core vocabulary was broadly similar across age groups and countries however there were more differences between multiword sequences used and fringe vocabulary needed to be modified to reflect differences in vocabulary even across two different English speaking countries.

There are implications for helping children with CCN develop effective writing skills, perhaps by focussing on teaching some of the high frequency core words in reading and spelling lessons and giving fast access to them on AAC devices so children can focus on generating less frequently occurring words.

The authors suggest that core vocabularies that change over time are important to AAC users and that providing some multiword sequences as whole units might be useful, though these would need to vary between countries.


Things you may want to look into:

An Analysis of Reading and Spelling Abilities of Children Using AAC: Understanding a Continuum of Competence

Teaching Sound Letter Correspondence and Consonant-Vowel-Consonant Combinations to Young Children who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Evidence-based literacy instruction for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: a case study of a student with multiple disabilities

Core vocabulary in written personal narratives of school-age children

 Added to site December 16


 

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