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Study of Gaze Toward Humans in Photographs by Individuals with Autism, Down Syndrome, or Other Intellectual Disabilities (short summary)

Study
of
Gaze
Toward
Humans
in
Photographs

Eye tracking technology was used to investigate the gaze and fixation patterns of adolescents with and without disabilities when looking at visual scene displays (VSDs) that included a human figure taking up a relatively small percentage of the total area of the scene. They found that all of the participating groups, including those with autism, Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities, fixated on the person in the majority of the photographs and for a significant percentage of the time spent engaged with the picture.

Further research is needed into this area, but indications are that the inclusion of human figures into VSDs being used to support communication might be beneficial in increasing visual engagement with the scene.


Things you may want to look into:

Designing AAC Systems for Children with Autism: Evidence from Eye Tracking Research

Eye Tracking as a Measure of Receptive Vocabulary in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Hidden communicative competence: Case study evidence using eye-tracking and video analysis

The Potential Influence of Stimulus Overselectivity in AAC: Information from Eye Tracking and Behavioral Studies of Attention with Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

Added to site March 2015


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