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Social media experiences of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (short summary)

Social
Media
 
Experiences
 
of
People
 
with
Cerebral Palsy
 
who
 
use
AAC

Recent developments in technology have increased opportunities for communication through social media, however for people who use augmentative and alternative communication (PWUAAC) the new opportunities are not always matched by improved access.

A much lower percentage of people with disabilities use the internet than those without disabilities across all age groups.

This study looked at the views and experiences of adults who have cerebral palsy about using social media.

An online focus group was used to gather evidence about participant’s views of the benefits and disadvantages of social media use for people with complex communication needs (CCN). A number of benefits, disadvantages and barriers were identified and some recommendations were made for professionals, support personnel, policy makers and technology developers to support the use of social media by PWUAAC.


Things you may want to look into:

Social media experiences of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication

A grounded theory of Internet and social media use by young people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)

‘‘We definitely need an audience’’: experiences of Twitter, Twitter networks and tweet content in adults with severe communication disabilities who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)

Happy and excited: Perceptions of using digital technology and social media by young people who use augmentative and alternative communication

 

Added to site December 16



 

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