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The Phonological Awareness Abilities of Children with Cerebral Palsy who do not Speak (short summary)

speech
awareness
of
children
with
cerebral
 
palsy

The authors compared the performance of groups of speaking and non-speaking children with cerebral palsy and a group without disabilities in a number of tasks which looked at their ability to detect, identify and manipulate the sound structure of language (phonological awareness).

They found few statistically significant differences between the groups in the tasks they were asked to carry out, but concluded that the ability to speak is important in some aspects of sound processing which meant that speaking children might have an advantage over non-speaking in the acquisition of literacy skills.


Things you may want to look into:

Reading and spelling, phonological awareness, and working memory in children with severe speech impairments: A longitudinal study

Words in puddles of sound: modelling psycholinguistic effects in speech segmentation

Initial insights into phoneme awareness intervention for children with complex communication needs

Added to site July 2014