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Initial Insights into Phoneme Awareness Intervention for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
Insights
into
 
phoneme
 
awareness
 
intervention
 
for
children
 
with
complex
communication
needs

This study aimed to determine if phoneme awareness skills can be taught to children with complex communication needs (CCN), to observe any transfer effects to tasks that were not directly targeted during the intervention and to their ability to produce and record written words.

Phoneme awareness is the ability to recognise and manipulate the individual sounds in spoken words and is part of the broader phonological awareness that is essential to the development of early reading skills. Children with CCN often have significant and long-term difficulties in the development of literacy; poor phoneme awareness has been suggested as possibly limiting their word recognition and spelling skills.

Two children with CCN took part in the study, with personalised targets based on assessment of their pre-intervention skills. These included improving phoneme identifying skills, increasing letter name and letter sound knowledge, improving phoneme segmentation and manipulation skills and increasing awareness of the relationship between speech and print.


Both participants showed improvements in targeted skills, indicating that children with CCN can benefit from some types of input used to develop the literacy skills of children with a recording disability or spoken language impairment, however children with CCN often take longer to give a response than typically developing peers which means that they might need a longer time to consolidate and generalise skills.

This study provided initial evidence to support the usefulness of phoneme awareness intervention for children with CCN, but further studies are needed.


Things you may want to look into:
An Analysis of Reading and Spelling Abilities of Children Using AAC: Understanding a Continuum of Competence
Introduction to direct/explicit instruction in reading for the struggling reader: Phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension
Teaching Sound Letter Correspondence and Consonant-Vowel-Consonant Combinations to Young Children who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication
A Developmental Continuum of Phonological Sensitivity Skills
Evidence-based literacy instruction for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: a case study of a student with multiple disabilities

Added to site May 2016


 

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