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Augmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders (short summary)

Non-electronic
AAC
 
and
people
with
autism

This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of six adults with ASD, their support workers and family members, regarding the outcomes of providing them with low-tech communication aids.

The benefits of AAC for people with ASD were most frequently reported as in supporting their understanding. Visual AAC supports were felt to reduce levels of anxiety and so decrease incidences of challenging behaviour. One worker indicated that AAC led to benefits such as improved confidence and increased independence and helped unfamiliar people to communicate more successfully with the person with ASD.

Although several positive benefits of low-tech AAC support were identified some difficulties were noted by support workers. These were related mainly to issues of 'time' and individual workers views and attitudes to AAC.

The importance of ongoing professional support, training and education in the use of AAC systems and the need for ongoing advocacy for adults with ASD who use AAC is also recognised.


Things you may want to look into:

Demonstration of a method for assessing semantic organization and category membership in individuals with autism spectrum disorders and receptive vocabulary limitations

Strategies in Construction and Interpretation of Graphic-Symbol Sequences by Individuals who use AAC Systems

Can the facilitated communication method support autistic people, according to facilitators' opinions?

Adults with Autism


Added to site August 2015

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