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Augmentative and alternative communication in daily clinical practice: strategies and tools for management of severe communication disorders (short summary)

Use
of
AAC
after
a
stroke

This paper looks at the use of AAC with people who have had a stroke. Possible reasons for abandonment or unwillingness to use AAC systems are considered. The authors describe various elements of communicative competence that need to be taken into account when working with stroke patients and their families and carers and emphasise that the needs of people with severe communication impairments are diverse, as are considerations to be taken in identifying possible support systems. They conclude that early provision of appropriate resources to aid the regaining of communicative competence might lead to greater acceptance of AAC systems and the development of functional communication using a combination of natural speech and language and AAC strategies should be the aim of interventions.


Things you may want to look into:

The effect of remnant and pictographic books on the communicative interaction of individuals with global Aphasia 

Promoting acceptance of augmentative and alternative communication by adults with acquired communication disorders

Bill's experiences after a stroke

Terry using a communication aid after a stroke

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) for adults with severe aphasia: Where we stand and how we can go further

Weblinks - aphasia / stroke

Factsheet - What is a stroke?

Factsheet - What is Aphasia?

Factsheet - Dysarthria and Dysphasia

Added to site October 2014


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