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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (short summary)

 
The
 
Effects
 
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

Background

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (short summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Communicative participation changes in pre-school children receiving augmentative and alternative communication intervention (summary)

Participation
Changes
 
in
Children
 
Receiving
AAC
 
Intervention

Background

Participation or ‘involvement in life situations’ is recognised as vital to children’s development. Children with special needs generally want to participate meaningfully in their communities, however this is not always easy. Children who have significant communication impairments can face limited social interactions which in turn can lead to restricted play skills and possible rejection by their peers. These restrictions reduce opportunities to practise communication skills and so can become a vicious circle.

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Communicative participation changes in pre-school children receiving augmentative and alternative communication intervention (short summary)

Participation
Changes
 
in
Children
 
Receiving
AAC
 
Intervention

This study looked into the effects of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention on the real-life participation in communication activities of eight pre-school children.

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Acceptance of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Technology by Persons with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (short summary)

Acceptance
 
of
AAC
 
in
ALS

This study aimed to investigate whether there is a pattern to acceptance of high-tech augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices and to investigate the reasons for either acceptance or discontinuance of the use of AAC technology among people who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

The researchers found a very high rate of acceptance of AAC technology among the 50 participants. 90% showed immediate acceptance, 6% delayed acceptance and 4% rejection. None of the participants in this study discontinued their use of AAC until very close to the end of their lives.

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Augmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders (summary)

Non-electronic
AAC
 
and
people
with
autism

Background

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Augmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders (short summary)

Non-electronic
AAC
 
and
people
with
autism

This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of six adults with ASD, their support workers and family members, regarding the outcomes of providing them with low-tech communication aids.

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Skydive of communication interaction (short summary)

Sky
dive
of
communication
interaction

The authors of this paper use skydiving as a metaphor for aided communication. Both activities are centred around an individual participant, involve the use of a specialized piece of equipment and require certain skills and competencies that are developed over time. Participation in each activity is the result of a long-term learning process, and each occasion of involvement in the activity reflects an autonomous choice in a certain set of conditions.

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