Navbar
Content

aided communication

communication aids or devices are used to help communication, described more fully on the Communication Matters website http://www.communicationmatters.org.uk/glossary-term/aided-communication

A systematic review of research into aided AAC to increase social-communication functions in children with autism spectrum disorder (summary)

 
A
review
 
of
research
 
into
 
aided
AAC
 
to
increase
social-communication
 
functions
 
in
children
 
with
autism
 
spectrum
 
disorder

Background

Up to a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not develop functional speech. Many of them rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

While there is some evidence supporting the use of AAC with children with ASD it is still unclear how much its use has been taught to develop social communication and whether interventions effect sustained and meaningful change.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

A systematic review of research into aided AAC to increase social-communication functions in children with autism spectrum disorder (short summary)

 
A
review
 
of
research
 
into
 
aided
AAC
 
to
increase
social-communication
 
functions
 
in
children
 
with
autism
 
spectrum
 
disorder

Up to a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not develop functional speech. Many of them rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

While there is some evidence supporting the use of AAC with children with ASD it is still unclear how much its use has been taught to develop social communication and whether interventions effect sustained and meaningful change.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Background

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. This means that opportunities to communicate functionally need to be created and supported in the children’s natural environments including schools.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Syndicate content