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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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A comparison of two approaches for representing AAC vocabulary for young children (summary)

Comparing
Two
 
Kinds
 
of
Symbols
 
for
Young Children

Background

A significant percentage of children with special educational needs have complex communication needs and might benefit from the use of some form of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system.

It is important that these children are given early access to language and communication to enable them to express early communicative functions. Develop language concepts and build social relationships. This requires access to a wide range of vocabulary.

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A comparison of two approaches for representing AAC vocabulary for young children (short summary)

Comparing
Two
 
Kinds
 
of
Symbols
 
for
Young Children

The authors developed developmentally appropriate symbols (DAS) based on children’s interpretations of 10 abstract early language concepts; all gone, big, come, eat, more, open, up, want, what and who.

They compared the abilities of typically developing, preschool children to identify the DAS symbols to the same concepts represented by Picture Communication Symbols (PCS) which are based on adult understanding of the concepts. They also investigated whether the children preferred one type of symbol over the other and why.

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Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

Background

Many people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fail to develop enough speech to meet their everyday communication needs. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has been used successfully with some of this population. Possible AAC strategies for children with ASD include the use of manual signing, picture exchange and speech generating devices (SGDs). This leads to the question of which of these systems should be taught to any individual.

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Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (short summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

In this study, related to McLay et al 2015, the authors investigated whether two boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) could be taught to request continuation of toy play using ‘more’ using three different augmentative and alternative communication systems; signing, picture exchange and a speech generating device (SGD), whether this learning would be maintained over time and whether they would show a preference for any of the AAC systems over the others.

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Evaluating the Impact of AAC Interventions in Reducing Hospitalization-related Stress: Challenges and Possibilities (summary)

 
The
 
Effect
of
AAC
 
in
Reducing
Stress
 
in
Hospital

Background

A lot of children with communication difficulties need to use hospital services frequently and have a legal right to “be informed, to communicate, and to express opinions using their preferred means of communication including augmentative and alternative forms” (United Nations 2006). However hospitals often rely on parents to act as interpreters and have little knowledge of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and communication disabilities.

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Evaluating the Impact of AAC Interventions in Reducing Hospitalization-related Stress: Challenges and Possibilities (short summary)

 
The
 
Effect
 
of
AAC
 
in
Reducing
Stress
 
in
Hospital

Hospital visits and procedures can be distressing for children and their families and an inability to communicate feelings about this or to understand what is happening can increase stress.

Hospital staff often rely on parents of children with communication difficulties to act as interpreters and have little knowledge of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and communication disabilities.

This paper looks into some of the ways in which the effects of using AAC interventions in health care can be measured.

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (summary)

 
The
 
Effects
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

Background

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

Teaching speech to this group can be a very lengthy process and throughout this children do not have an effective means of communication.

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