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AAC and social interaction (short summary)

AAC
 
and
social
interaction

This study compared the use of a picture exchange system and a speech-generating device for a fifteen-year-old boy with autism and Down syndrome. The authors were interested in finding out whether teaching an AAC system could improve social interaction. Trevor, the boy in this study, successfully learned how to use both types of AAC systems to request his favourite snacks in response to prompts from a communication partner. Trevor did not clearly prefer one type of AAC over the other, and he remained socially withdrawn during these interactions.

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AAC and social interaction (summary)

AAC
 
and
social
interaction

Background Many children with developmental disabilities who use AAC have deficits in social skills, or the ability to comfortably interact with others. While previous research in the field of paediatric AAC has shown that children often prefer one type of AAC over another, little research has been done on the potential effect of AAC interventions on social interactions of children with developmental disabilities.

What was the aim of the study? This study investigated the effects of AAC interventions of the social interactions of one child.

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Typical children’s graphic sequences (summary)

Typical
children’s
graphic
sequences

What was the aim of the study? This study explored the abilities of typically developing three- and four-year-old children in producing and understanding graphic symbol sequences.

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Typical children’s graphic sequences (short summary)

Typical
children’s
graphic
sequences

This study investigated how typically developing three- and four-year-old children produced and understood graphic symbol sequences. The children did not display one-to-one correspondences between elements in spoken language and graphic symbols in sequences. This suggests that symbol selection, rather than sequencing, could be an appropriate target of AAC intervention for young children and that communication partners must be flexible in their interpretation of graphic symbol sequences produced by young children.


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Visual support for language in ASD (summary)

Visual
support
for
language
in
autism

What was the aim of the study? This paper described an approach to AAC called the Visual Immersion Program, which helps children with autism spectrum disorders learn language and communicate.

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Visual support for language in ASD (short summary)

Visual
support
for
language
in
autism

Researchers at Children's Hospital Boston have developed an approach to AAC for children with ASD. The Visual Immersion Program builds on strengths that many children with ASD already have in order to teach them about language, communication and other skills. The program can be used on technology that is readily available on today's market; it does not require specialized, purpose-built AAC systems.


Things you may want to look into:

webcast of Visual Immersion Program

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