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Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

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Joint decision making using Talking Mats (short summary)

Combined
decision
making
with
Talking Mats

The authors compared the amount of involvement people with dementia and their family carers felt they had in discussions and decisions about activities of daily living using Talking Mats and their usual methods of communication.

They found that both people with dementia and their carers were more satisfied when Talking Mats were used.


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Non-electronic communication aids (short summary)

Low
technology
communication

This paper explored support for non-electronic communication aids. These low-tech forms of AAC may be just as valuable as high-tech aids for adults with disabilities, but most government policy and research literature addresses electronic communication aids, or speech-generating devices. The Non-Electronic Communication Aids Scheme, a pilot project run in Victoria, Australia, demonstrated that adults with a variety of diagnoses can benefit from non-electronic aids, and the project received a greater demand than it could accommodate.

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Non-electronic communication aids (summary)

Low
technology
communication

Background There are two main types of communication aids. High-tech, or electronic, communication aids include speech-generating devices with a variety of ways to generate messages. Low-tech, or non-electronic, communication aids do not have speech output functions and also lack other features that may assist the speedy generation of messages.

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Non-electronic communication aids for people with complex communication needs

Non-electronic communication aids for people with complex communication needs, Iacono, Teresa, Lyon Katie, and West Denise , International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Oct, Volume 13, Issue 5, p.399-410, (2011)
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Adam’s experiences with different AAC systems

different
AAC
systems

I am a speech and language therapist and want to share the story of a young man with you. ‘Adam’ is now nearly 19 and I have known him since he was seven. He has always been a friendly young man who likes to help. He gets his message across to you by taking you by the hand to something he wants, or by pulling at your jersey and pointing to things. He uses his voice well and by that you can tell when he is happy, concerned, uncertain, angry and a range of other emotions.

Over the years we have tried lots of different AAC systems with Adam

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