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Speech-Generating Devices Used at Home by Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (summary)

VOCAs
 
used
 
at
Home
 
by
Children
 
with
 
ASD

Background

Difficulties with language and communication are a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many people who have ASD might benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) either permanently or in the short-term. The development of technology and a range of speech generating devices (SGDs) can be effective for some people with ASD who have limited or no functional speech.

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Speech-Generating Devices Used at Home by Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (short summary)

VOCAs
 
used
 
at
Home
 
by
Children
 
with
 
ASD

Difficulties with language and communication are a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many people who have ASD might benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) either permanently or in the short-term. The development of technology and a range of speech generating devices (SGDs) can be effective for some people with ASD who have limited or no functional speech.

This study looked at the use of speech generating devices (SGDs) at home and with children who had some functional speech.

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It’s good to talk: developing the communication skills of an adult with an intellectual disability through augmentative and alternative communication (summary)

 
It’s
good
 
to
talk

Background

People who have intellectual disabilities (ID) often have associated difficulties with communication which effect all aspects of their lives. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems have been identified by researchers as a way of improving communicative abilities and participation in interactions. There is a recognised link between communication difficulties and challenging behaviour, limited communication skills might lead to people using behaviour as a means of communicating their needs, wishes and feelings.

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It’s good to talk: developing the communication skills of an adult with an intellectual disability through augmentative and alternative communication (short summary)

 
It’s
good
 
to
talk

A single case study is presented, looking at effects the introduction of a dynamic display speech generating device (SGD) had on the communication and pragmatic skills of a 40 year old woman who was non-verbal and had moderate intellectual disabilities (ID). The subject also had some challenging behaviours related to her wish to be able to communicate more effectively with a wide range of people.

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iPads, Mobile Technologies, and Communication Applications: A Survey of Family Wants, Needs, and Preferences (summary)

Technology
 
and
families
of
people
who
use
AAC

Background

The rapid development of iPads and other mobile technology in recent years is affecting both the study and practice of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and impacting on service delivery, the work of speech and language therapists (SLTs) and families of people who use AAC.

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iPads, Mobile Technologies, and Communication Applications: A Survey of Family Wants, Needs, and Preferences (short summary)

Technology
 
and
families
of
people
who
use
AAC

As the availability of mobile technology and apps increases, and the cost reduces, the researchers used an online survey to investigate what the families of children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) wanted from technology and the support services around this.

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Comparison of Communication using an iPad and a Picture Based System (short summary)

Comparison
of
Communication
using
iPad
 
and
Symbols

The communication behaviours of five pupils with ASD and/or learning disabilities were compared using either a picture symbol communication system or the 'Pick a Word' app on the iPad.

The authors found that use of the iPad did not detract from the pupil's communication; the number of communication behaviours either increased or stayed the same.

They also suggest that though iPads are now readily available they are not necessarily better than other speech generating devices and more research is needed into comparing the systems.

Comparison of Communication using an iPad and a Picture Based System (summary)

Comparison
of
Communication
Using
iPad
 
and
Symbols

Background AAC interventions have been shown to improve social and communication skills in young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (autism) and other developmental disabilities. Systems which include visual symbols might appeal to the visual strengths of some people with autism and systems such as the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) have been found to be effective for many people in this group.

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