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Eye gaze technology: a South African perspective (summary)

Eye-gaze
 
technology:
 
a
South African
 
perspective

Background

This study looks at Bronfenbrenner’s biological theory of human development as a framework for describing the ways in which environmental influences can support or hinder the use of assistive technology, specifically eye-gaze controlled communication for young children with disabilities. The theory uses the ‘model of the ecology as nested systems’, dividing influencing factors into:

Microsystems – the immediate environment within which the child functions.

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Eye gaze technology: a South African perspective (short summary)

Eye-gaze
 
technology:
 
a
South African
 
perspective

This study uses two South African case reports to look at Bronfenbrenner’s biological theory of human development as a framework for describing the ways in which environmental influences can support or hinder the use of assistive technology, specifically eye-gaze controlled communication for young children with disabilities.

They identify factors in a number of different ‘systems’ around the child that could influence how successful they were in developing use of high tech systems for communication.

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Eye Gaze Technology as a Form of Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Individuals with Rett Syndrome: Experiences of Families in The Netherlands (summary)

Eye-gaze
 
as
 
a
 
form
 
of
AAC
 
for
people
 
with
 
Rett
 
Syndrome

Background

Over recent years the use of eye-gaze and eye tracking technology to support communication for people with Rett syndrome (RTT) has increased with many families wanting high-tech eye gaze systems.

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Eye Gaze Technology as a Form of Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Individuals with Rett Syndrome: Experiences of Families in The Netherlands (short summary)

Eye-gaze
 
as
 
a
 
form
 
of
AAC
 
for
People
 
with
 
Rett
 
Syndrome

Background

This study looked into the use of eye gaze and eye tracking technology from the point of view of families of people with Rett Syndrome (RTT) in The Netherlands.

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Study of Gaze Toward Humans in Photographs by Individuals with Autism, Down Syndrome, or Other Intellectual Disabilities (summary)

Study
of
Gaze
Toward
Humans
in
Photographs

Background

Visual Scene Displays (VSDs) might be a useful tool for AAC interventions for some people with complex communication needs (CCN), supporting the learning of language within a social setting and learning vocabulary meaning within a shared and familiar social experience with a communication partner, but research is needed into their optimum design.

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Study of Gaze Toward Humans in Photographs by Individuals with Autism, Down Syndrome, or Other Intellectual Disabilities (short summary)

Study
of
Gaze
Toward
Humans
in
Photographs

Eye tracking technology was used to investigate the gaze and fixation patterns of adolescents with and without disabilities when looking at visual scene displays (VSDs) that included a human figure taking up a relatively small percentage of the total area of the scene. They found that all of the participating groups, including those with autism, Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities, fixated on the person in the majority of the photographs and for a significant percentage of the time spent engaged with the picture.

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Michael's Eye Gaze Story

Michael's
Eye
Gaze
Story

Michael is in his forties. He left his special school at the age of 19 and has lived at home with his mum and spent time at day centres since then. Michael has cerebral palsy and lots of physical difficulties. After he left school, staff thought he had severe learning disabilities. As he had no way of communicating easily with people they often assumed he did not understand what was being said to him. Over the years Michael had become very withdrawn and had given up trying to let staff at the day centre know what he wanted as they were unable to interpret his attempts to communicate.

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