Navbar
Content

vocabulary

Social Validation of Vocabulary Selection: Ensuring Stakeholder Relevance

Social Validation of Vocabulary Selection: Ensuring Stakeholder Relevance, Bornman, J., and Nelson Bryen D. , Journal of Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Volume 29, Issue 2, p.174-181, (2013)
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

The Vocabulary of Beginning Writers: Implications for Children with Complex Communication Needs (summary)

 
The
Vocabulary
 
of
Young
Writers:
Implications
 
for
Children
 
with
 
CCN

Background

This study explored vocabulary used in typical written language development and whether knowledge about this could be applied to developing vocabulary sets for children with complex communication needs (CCN).

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

The Vocabulary of Beginning Writers: Implications for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
The
Vocabulary
 
of
Young
Writers:
Implications
 
for
Children
 
with
 
CCN

This study investigated the vocabulary used in the self-selected writing of typically developing young school age children in USA and New Zealand and considered whether the information gathered could be beneficial in selecting vocabulary available on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to support the development of writing for children with complex communication needs (CCN).

It was found that a small core vocabulary accounted for a large percentage of the written work and this was largely grammatical words.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

The Oral Core Vocabulary of Typically Developing English-Speaking School-Aged Children: Implications for AAC Practice (summary)

Words
used
by
pupils
who
can
talk

Background

The selection of appropriate vocabulary for AAC systems can be challenging for professionals working with people who use AAC (PWUAAC). Typically they rely on a range of sources to help select vocabulary, one of these is core vocabulary lists, which are generated from research into the frequency of words used by typically developing individuals of similar age to the AAC user.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

The Oral Core Vocabulary of Typically Developing English-Speaking School-Aged Children: Implications for AAC Practice (short summary)

Words
used
by
pupils
who
can
talk

Researchers investigated the vocabulary used by typically developing children aged 7 to 14 years in school lessons and activities. The participants included native English speakers and children who spoke English as a second language (ESL).

They found that a small core vocabulary of 100 to 200 words accounted for 75-85% of the vocabulary used for both native English and ESL speakers with great overlap in the most commonly used words in both groups.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Syndicate content