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cerebral palsy (CP)

a group of chronic conditions affecting body movements and muscle coordination, caused by damage to one or more specific areas of the brain

The Loneliness Experiences of Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy who use Alternative and Augmentative Communication (summary)

 
The
Loneliness
Experiences
of
Young Adults
who
use
AAC

Background

Communication is a significant factor in the maintenance of friendships for young adults. Communicative interactions can be difficult for people who use AAC (PWUAAC) which can make it harder to form and maintain friendships and other relationships, thus increasing the risk of loneliness.

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The Loneliness Experiences of Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy who use Alternative and Augmentative Communication (short summary)

 
The
Loneliness
Experiences
of
Young Adults
who
use
AAC

Communication is a significant factor in the maintenance of friendships for young adults. Communicative interactions can be difficult for people who use augmentative and alternative communication (PWUAAC) which can make it harder to form and maintain friendships and other relationships, thus increasing the risk of loneliness.

The authors used interviews with five young adults with cerebral palsy who used AAC to investigate their experiences of loneliness and their experiences of developing and maintaining friendships.

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The effect of shared book reading on the acquisition of expressive vocabulary of a 7 year old who uses AAC (summary)

Outcome
of
shared
book
reading
on
child

Background

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often have difficulties in many aspects of language acquisition compared to typically developing children.

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The effect of shared book reading on the acquisition of expressive vocabulary of a 7 year old who uses AAC (short summary)

Outcome
of
shared
book
reading
on
child

A single case study aimed to look at whether taking part in a book reading intervention programme improved the expressive vocabulary of a 7 year old girl who used AAC. The study is described in some detail.

Increases were found in the total number and range of words used and the types of words these were. There was also an increase in the number of multi-word utterances. These gains were at least partially maintained at the follow up point.

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Exploring Communication Assistants as an Option for Increasing Communication Access to Communities for People who use Augmentative Communication (summary)

Use
of
communication assistants

Background

Community participation and inclusion are fundamental principles within the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and communication is central to this process. It is therefore important to identify supports needed by people who use AAC (PWUAAC) to enable them to fully participate in society and to communicate with others within their communities.

People with complex communication needs (CCN) report a number of communication barriers with unfamiliar people, which can increase feelings of social isolation.

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Exploring Communication Assistants as an Option for Increasing Communication Access to Communities for People who use Augmentative Communication (short summary)

Use
of
communication assistants

13 communication assistants were trained to work with 9 people who use AAC (PWUAAC), to support their communication within their local communities and to increase opportunities for and quality of interactions with other communication partners.

AAC users used the assistants to help them prepare for communication events, support them in making phone calls, writing and using the internet and communicating directly with familiar and unfamiliar communication partners and other PWUAAC, over a 9 month period.

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Teaching Sound Letter Correspondence and Consonant-Vowel-Consonant Combinations to Young Children who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (summary)

helping
young children
match
sounds
to
letters

 

Background
For children who are at a pre-reading (emergent literacy) level phonological awareness and sound-letter knowledge are two of the strongest predictors of future reading ability. Phonological awareness is the ability to recognise that spoken words are made up of sequences of sounds, part of this is phonemic awareness; the understanding that words can be broken down into phonemes, the smallest sounds that make up words.

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Teaching Sound Letter Correspondence and Consonant-Vowel-Consonant Combinations to Young Children who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

helping
young children
match
sounds
to
letters

The authors wanted to examine the effectiveness of an intervention strategy to teach sound-letter correspondence and the spelling of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) combinations to young children who use AAC in a mainstream classroom by arranging the environment to create learning opportunities, providing adaptations to support the participation of AAC users and using specific instructional strategies.

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Theory of mind in children with severe speech and physical impairment (SSPI): a longitudinal study (summary)

Theory
of
mind
in
children
with
severe
disability

Background
The term theory of mind (ToM) relates to being able to attribute thought beliefs and feelings to ourselves and other people and to understand that how we behave is linked to these things. Children also need to understand that beliefs are not always true and can represent the world incorrectly. Testing a child's ability to recognise this 'false-belief' is the most commonly used way of determining whether a child has developed ToM.

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Theory of mind in children with severe speech and physical impairment (SSPI): a longitudinal study (short summary)

Theory
of
mind
in
children
with
severe
disability

The researchers looked at the development of Theory of Mind (ToM) in a group of young children with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI) compared to a typically developing peer group over a four year period.

The term theory of mind (ToM) relates to being able to attribute thought beliefs and feelings to ourselves and other people and to understand that how we behave is linked to these things.

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