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autism (ASD)

a congenital condition that affects people in a spectrum of ways (autism spectrum disorder - ASD), characterised by an inability to understand how to interact socially: see also Asperger syndrome

The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (summary)

 
The
 
Effects
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

Background

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

Teaching speech to this group can be a very lengthy process and throughout this children do not have an effective means of communication.

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (short summary)

 
The
 
Effects
 
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

Background

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Predicting progress in Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) use by children with autism (short summary)

Predicting
Progress
 
in
PECS

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a communication system designed mainly for use by non-verbal children with autism. It has generally been found to have positive outcomes in a range of areas, including social communication skills, decrease in challenging behaviour and possible increases in the use of spoken language. However there is limited information available to support professionals to make predictions about the amount of progress individuals might make using PECS.

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Speech-Generating Devices Used at Home by Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (summary)

VOCAs
 
used
 
at
Home
 
by
Children
 
with
 
ASD

Background

Difficulties with language and communication are a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many people who have ASD might benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) either permanently or in the short-term. The development of technology and a range of speech generating devices (SGDs) can be effective for some people with ASD who have limited or no functional speech.

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Speech-Generating Devices Used at Home by Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (short summary)

VOCAs
 
used
 
at
Home
 
by
Children
 
with
 
ASD

Difficulties with language and communication are a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many people who have ASD might benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) either permanently or in the short-term. The development of technology and a range of speech generating devices (SGDs) can be effective for some people with ASD who have limited or no functional speech.

This study looked at the use of speech generating devices (SGDs) at home and with children who had some functional speech.

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Augmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders (summary)

Non-electronic
AAC
 
and
people
with
autism

Background

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Augmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders (short summary)

Non-electronic
AAC
 
and
people
with
autism

This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of six adults with ASD, their support workers and family members, regarding the outcomes of providing them with low-tech communication aids.

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Social Interactions of Students with Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Inclusive Classrooms (summary)

Background

The importance of peer interaction for students with severe disabilities has been recognised for a long time, with peer interactions promoting development and learning in school-age children. There is evidence that good peer interaction experiences are associated with a range of positive outcomes whilst the reverse is true of a lack of peer relationships.

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Social Interactions of Students with Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Inclusive Classrooms (short summary)

Social
interaction
of
pupils
who
use
AAC

The authors investigated the social communication interactions of 16 pupils with intellectual disabilities and/or autism, in mainstream classes. All participants used some form of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and were supported in school by one to one support workers.

They found that the students who used AAC had significantly more interactions with adults than with their typically developing peers. They also tended to initiate fewer interactions and these were for different communicative functions.

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