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aphasia

loss of language and communication skills, usually after suffering a stroke: also see dysphasia

Augmentative and alternative communication in daily clinical practice: strategies and tools for management of severe communication disorders (short summary)

Use
of
AAC
after
a
stroke

This paper looks at the use of AAC with people who have had a stroke. Possible reasons for abandonment or unwillingness to use AAC systems are considered. The authors describe various elements of communicative competence that need to be taken into account when working with stroke patients and their families and carers and emphasise that the needs of people with severe communication impairments are diverse, as are considerations to be taken in identifying possible support systems.

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Light Technology Augmentative Communication for Acute Care and Rehab Settings (summary)

Low
technology
AAC
after
stroke

Background

Therapists working in hospital settings with patients who have recently had a stroke try both to improve the patient's ability to communicate functionally and to give strategies to help compensate for communication difficulties that might remain.

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Light Technology Augmentative Communication for Acute Care and Rehab Settings (short summary)

Low
technology
AAC
after
stroke

A consideration of the role of low and light-tech AAC strategies in helping people compensate for communication difficulties as a result of a stroke.

This paper looks at a number of different possible approaches to supporting communication for people with aphasia in the early stages of recovery and emphasises the importance of involving patients and their families in decisions about their care.

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Using AAC to communicate with medical staff (short summary)

Using
AAC
 
to
communicate
with
medical
staff

The authors used semi structured interviews and a focus group to find out how people who use AAC felt about communication with primary health care staff e.g. GPs. They found that AAC users felt it was easier to communicate with doctors who were specialists or who had known them for a long time than with those who were less familiar with AAC systems.

They concluded that everyone involved in these consultations needed to take time to prepare and that there is a need for on-going communication training for doctors throughout their careers.


Added to site January 2014

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Using AAC to communicate with medical staff (summary)

What was the aim of the study? The study aimed to find out about the experiences of people who use AAC in communicating with primary care health professionals (e.g.GPs).

Why was the paper written? There is evidence that people with disabilities are less likely than the population in general to use primary or preventative health care services. The authors wanted to find out about AAC users experiences of non-hospital based healthcare and identify any barriers to effective communication and strategies used to overcome these.

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