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The use of social media by adults with acquired conditions who use AAC: current gaps and considerations in research (short summary)

 
The
 
use
 
of
social
media
 
by
adults
 
with
acquired
 
conditions
 
who
 
use
AAC:
 
current
gaps
 
and
considerations
 
in
research

This paper considers the use of social media for communication by adults with a range of acquired neurological disorders. It briefly reviews the limited research into social media use by this population and discusses both positive and negative aspects.
The author aims to summarise recent research findings on adults with acquired conditions who use AAC and social media, identify gaps and priorities for future research in this area and suggest how the research might be performed. Seven priority areas for research to develop the evidence base in this field are identified and discussed.

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Acceptance of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Technology by Persons with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (short summary)

Acceptance
 
of
AAC
 
in
ALS

This study aimed to investigate whether there is a pattern to acceptance of high-tech augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices and to investigate the reasons for either acceptance or discontinuance of the use of AAC technology among people who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

The researchers found a very high rate of acceptance of AAC technology among the 50 participants. 90% showed immediate acceptance, 6% delayed acceptance and 4% rejection. None of the participants in this study discontinued their use of AAC until very close to the end of their lives.

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Using different methods to communicate: how adults with severe acquired communication difficulties make decisions about the communication methods they use and how they experience them (summary)

Using
different
methods
 
to
communicate

Background

It is recognised that assistive technologies, including augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be beneficial in helping improve the quality of life for adults with complex needs. People with acquired communication difficulties have to make many decisions about new technologies and also learn how to use them.

Involving communication aid users in decision making about which systems to use and in what situations is known to be beneficial but does not always happen.

Using different methods to communicate: how adults with severe acquired communication difficulties make decisions about the communication methods they use and how they experience them (short summary)

Using
different
methods
 
to
communicate

The researchers interviewed several men with acquired neurological disorders about their choice of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods. They found that the choice of method used to communicate is individual and professionals need to take this into consideration when working with clients with acquired neurological conditions. Often different methods will be chosen for different situations and communication partners.

Evaluation of language and communication skills in adult key word signing users with intellectual disability: Advantages of a narrative task (short summary)

Advantages
of
a
narrative
task

Narrative skills are those skills needed to tell stories or recount things that have happened. The ability to use narrative depends on a wide range of language, communication and cognitive skills. The use of narrative can be a way of gathering information about language content and form in a short period of time but in the main this type of task has not been used with adults with intellectual disability (ID), particularly those who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).

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It’s good to talk: developing the communication skills of an adult with an intellectual disability through augmentative and alternative communication (summary)

 
It’s
good
 
to
talk

Background

People who have intellectual disabilities (ID) often have associated difficulties with communication which effect all aspects of their lives. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems have been identified by researchers as a way of improving communicative abilities and participation in interactions. There is a recognised link between communication difficulties and challenging behaviour, limited communication skills might lead to people using behaviour as a means of communicating their needs, wishes and feelings.

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It’s good to talk: developing the communication skills of an adult with an intellectual disability through augmentative and alternative communication (short summary)

 
It’s
good
 
to
talk

A single case study is presented, looking at effects the introduction of a dynamic display speech generating device (SGD) had on the communication and pragmatic skills of a 40 year old woman who was non-verbal and had moderate intellectual disabilities (ID). The subject also had some challenging behaviours related to her wish to be able to communicate more effectively with a wide range of people.

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Augmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders (summary)

Non-electronic
AAC
 
and
people
with
autism

Background

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