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Beliefs and habits: staff experiences with key word signing in special schools and group residential homes (summary)

Staff
experiences
 
with
 
key
 
word
signing
 
in
 
special
schools
 
and
residential
 
homes

Background

Up to around a quarter of adults with learning disabilities (LD) use key word signing (KWS); using signs to support important words in their spoken language. Some users might use KWS as an alternative communication system without speech. KWS is used to support both expressive and receptive language. It is thought that the use of KWS, adding a visual input to the auditory given by speech, helps to support understanding. In addition the use of KWS usually slows the rate of speech and might simplify the message.

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Beliefs and habits: staff experiences with key word signing in special schools and group residential homes (short summary)

Staff
experiences
 
with
 
key
 
word
signing
 
in
 
special
schools
 
and
residential
 
homes

This study used interview data to investigate the views of 5 teachers and 5 support staff working with people with learning disabilities (LD) who used key word signing (KWS) towards its use. The attitudes of communication partners to the use of KWS are key to its success. Without a positive view it is less likely to be used successfully by and with people who have LD.

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Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of ‘‘smart’’ mobile devices (summary)

AAC devices
 
for
 
aphasia;
 
the
 
role
of
smart
mobile
 
devices

Background

Despite the increase in availability of mobile apps and smart technology for communication there has been little research into their use with adults who have aphasia; usually an older age group with acquired communication difficulties.

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Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of ‘‘smart’’ mobile devices (short summary)

AAC devices
 
for
 
aphasia;
 
the
 
role
 
of
smart
mobile
 
devices

People who have aphasia often use a combination of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies to support their interactions.

This paper aimed to gather an overall perspective on high-tech device use in this population through gathering information from professionals working with them. The information was gathered via a web-based survey of professionals, observation of group therapy sessions and focus groups of clinicians from the group therapy centres.

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Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of ‘‘smart’’ mobile devices (short summary)

People who have aphasia often use a combination of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies to support their interactions.

This paper aimed to gather an overall perspective on high-tech device use in this population through gathering information from professionals working with them. The information was gathered via a web-based survey of professionals, observation of group therapy sessions and focus groups of clinicians from the group therapy centres.

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The use of social media by adults with acquired conditions who use AAC: current gaps and considerations in research (summary)

 
The
 
use
 
of
social
media
 
by
adults
 
with
acquired
 
conditions
 
who
 
use
AAC:
 
current
gaps
 
and
considerations
 
in
research

Background

There are increasing numbers of adults with acquired neurological disorders who might use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The range of disorders is diverse, including stroke, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, head and neck cancer, traumatic brain injury etc.

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