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Comparing Teacher and Student Use and Preference of Two Methods of Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Picture Exchange and a Speech-Generating Device

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TitleComparing Teacher and Student Use and Preference of Two Methods of Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Picture Exchange and a Speech-Generating Device
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractHandheld computing technologies such as the iPad®, which can be adapted to function as a speech-generating device, has led to an influx of evolutions comparing modalities of Augmentative and Alternative Communication systems (AAC) in the acquisition of a mand (i.e., request) repertoire in children with autism and related developmental disabilities. While these studies have consistently yielded results indicating equal acquisition across picture-based systems (PE) and the SGD, they have demonstrated a primary preference for the SGD. The purpose of this study was to extend such research by comparing not only student acquisition and preference, but also stakeholder fidelity of use and preference. Using an alternating treatment design, teachers and paraprofessionals were instructed to conduct mand training trials using both a PE system and an iPad® Mini with the application Proloqu2Go™as a SGD, with seven school aged children with a diagnosis of autism or downs syndrome. Following 10-weeks of data collection, the student participants were exposed to a device preference assessment and teachers completed a social validity questionnaire to assess preference. The results were consistent with previous research indicating equal acquisition and fidelity of use across both devices; but a general preference for the iPad® based SGD.
AuthorsLorah, E. R.
Year of Publication2016
PublicationJournal of Developmental and Physical Disability
Volume28
Pages751-767
ISSN1056-263X (print) 1573-3580 (online)
Publisher DOIhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10882-016-9507-z
Keywords (MeSH)autistic disorder, communication aids for disabled, computers-handheld, developmental disabilities, Down syndrome
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