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AAC and Severe Aphasia--Enhancing Communication Across the Continuum of Recovery

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TitleAAC and Severe Aphasia--Enhancing Communication Across the Continuum of Recovery
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractTraditional aphasia treatment focuses on improving the disability level of people with aphasia, for example, assisting them to speak more effectively, comprehend more fully, or write with fewer errors. Many reports show that stimulation-type aphasia therapy works—that people with aphasia do indeed become better speakers or listeners (Holland, Fromm, DeRuyter, & Stein, 1996; Wertz et al., 1981). However, other literature suggests that some individuals with aphasia, in particular severe aphasia, never recover enough from their disabilities to become functional, competent communicators unless alternate intervention models are introduced (Fox & Fried-Oken, 1996; Holland, 1998; Poeck, Huber, & Willmes, 1989).
AuthorsGarrett, K. L., and Lasker J. P.
Year of Publication2007
PublicationPerspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Volume17
Issue3
Pages6-15
ISBN1940-7769
Publisher DOIhttp://sig2perspectives.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=1758271
NotesArticle adapted from Garrett, K. L., & Lasker, J. P. (2007). AAC and severe aphasia: Enhancing communication across the continuum of recovery. Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, 17, 6–15 available at http://www.asha.org/Publications/leader/2008/080617/f080617a.htm
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